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  1. Yesterday
  2. The May Massacre - Rend Alpha Gameplay Footage

    Was interesting to watch and leads to more questions than answers (for someone who hasn't played). Curious to see the game in the fall and see what has changed since. This video also shows factions are a great idea but hardly a cure all and can actually lead to just as lopsided PVP as any other survival game.
  3. Last week
  4. Almost forgot to post it here! Got a highlight and (a lot of) footage of an intense raid on Revenant base during the alpha test in May. Some people streamed it, but it's all since gone from Twitch. Enjoy!
  5. Earlier
  6. 2 New FKers!

    RU: https://vk.com/frostkeep?w=page-142823387_53158011
  7. Meet the FK'ers - Jeremy Wood

    Continuing from the last Meet the FK'ers with Jordan Leithart, we've got a brief chat with Frostkeep co-founder Jeremy Wood. Check it out below. RF: What's your name and what do you do at Frostkeep? JW: Jeremy Wood, Co-Founder RF: Tell us a little about your backstory, where have you worked prior to joining Frostkeep, what games have you been involved in making? JW: I got my start as an engineer on the original World of Warcraft team back in 2001. After seven years and two expansions, I moved onto Titan, which eventually became Overwatch. In 2012, I joined Carbine to work on WildStar, until forming Frostkeep in 2016. RF: What game most influenced you? Was it something in your childhood or in later years? JW: I play a wide variety of games, PC and console, as many as I can get my hands on. I feel that there is something to learn from every single game, and the more I play, the better I am able to contribute to the games I work on. World of Warcraft is probably my single biggest influence, and probably the game I've sunk the most time into over the years. RF: What are you main influences in your work? Is there anything outside of the gaming world you feel has helped you become a better developer? Being a successful game developer is mostly about effective two-way communication. I am always looking to better myself from that standpoint, and I've been incredibly fortunate to learn from many amazing people, both professionally and personally. Understanding human psychology provides great tools for communication, as well as for game design in general. Game developers tend to focus so much on "fun", which is ultimately impossible to quantify. Really boiling down the psychological impact of content and systems is a more objective way of measuring the success of your designs. RF: There have been a lot of Early Access Survival games released over the last few years, what do you think makes Rend stand out from the rest of them? JW: The biggest things we've tried to do with Rend is provide social structure for those who come in alone or in small groups, and to really give strong competitive goals to all players. Most survival games rely entirely on their sandbox elements, which is obviously enough for a large section of players. Our aim is to bring some structure to the genre and attract a wider swath of players to this rich and interesting survival community. RF: The team have been pretty fantastic at engaging with the community so far, is that something you feel is a real differentiator between Frostkeep and your competition? JW: One of our goals as a company has always been to be "real", cliched as that may be. We are gamers just like everyone else in our community, and we engage with them as gamers first, not as developers. We are all creating Rend together, even if Frostkeep is ultimately making the decisions and building the game. We want to be human beings, rather than faceless PR bots, and that means sharing in our failures and our successes, and ultimately being honest with the community about the realities of game development. RF: Being with such a small team, what benefits do you feel you have against working in a traditional AAA studio? What do you miss from previous work? JW: Our size allows us to have a highly collaborative work environment, in a way that would be difficult in a larger team setting. We all sit in one room, working together on every problem. Everyone's voice is heard and given equal objective weight. We can quickly pivot on new ideas without hours and days of meetings. The downside, of course, is limited resources. We have to be very conscious of our direction, and make sure that we have the capability of delivering on our goals. RF: What's next after Early Access, are there any extra features you'd love to implement in Rend? JW: We come from a MMO background, where launch is just the beginning, and Rend will be no different in that regard. During Early Access, we will be adding tons of content and features, working with the community to grow the game into a full and satisfying product. When we think we have come to a point where Rend is truly a complete game experience, we will lift the Early Access tag. After that, we will take stock and see where Rend should go, whether that be new maps, new game modes, etc. RF: And finally, which aspect of Rend are you most excited for players to get to experience? JW: The Reckoning, even in its early state, has been a blast. Experiencing a true war, where all sides are present attacking and defending, really epitomizes the fantasy that draws most people to the survival genre. View full news
  8. Meet the FK'ers - Jeremy Wood

    Continuing from the last Meet the FK'ers with Jordan Leithart, we've got a brief chat with Frostkeep co-founder Jeremy Wood. Check it out below. RF: What's your name and what do you do at Frostkeep? JW: Jeremy Wood, Co-Founder RF: Tell us a little about your backstory, where have you worked prior to joining Frostkeep, what games have you been involved in making? JW: I got my start as an engineer on the original World of Warcraft team back in 2001. After seven years and two expansions, I moved onto Titan, which eventually became Overwatch. In 2012, I joined Carbine to work on WildStar, until forming Frostkeep in 2016. RF: What game most influenced you? Was it something in your childhood or in later years? JW: I play a wide variety of games, PC and console, as many as I can get my hands on. I feel that there is something to learn from every single game, and the more I play, the better I am able to contribute to the games I work on. World of Warcraft is probably my single biggest influence, and probably the game I've sunk the most time into over the years. RF: What are you main influences in your work? Is there anything outside of the gaming world you feel has helped you become a better developer? Being a successful game developer is mostly about effective two-way communication. I am always looking to better myself from that standpoint, and I've been incredibly fortunate to learn from many amazing people, both professionally and personally. Understanding human psychology provides great tools for communication, as well as for game design in general. Game developers tend to focus so much on "fun", which is ultimately impossible to quantify. Really boiling down the psychological impact of content and systems is a more objective way of measuring the success of your designs. RF: There have been a lot of Early Access Survival games released over the last few years, what do you think makes Rend stand out from the rest of them? JW: The biggest things we've tried to do with Rend is provide social structure for those who come in alone or in small groups, and to really give strong competitive goals to all players. Most survival games rely entirely on their sandbox elements, which is obviously enough for a large section of players. Our aim is to bring some structure to the genre and attract a wider swath of players to this rich and interesting survival community. RF: The team have been pretty fantastic at engaging with the community so far, is that something you feel is a real differentiator between Frostkeep and your competition? JW: One of our goals as a company has always been to be "real", cliched as that may be. We are gamers just like everyone else in our community, and we engage with them as gamers first, not as developers. We are all creating Rend together, even if Frostkeep is ultimately making the decisions and building the game. We want to be human beings, rather than faceless PR bots, and that means sharing in our failures and our successes, and ultimately being honest with the community about the realities of game development. RF: Being with such a small team, what benefits do you feel you have against working in a traditional AAA studio? What do you miss from previous work? JW: Our size allows us to have a highly collaborative work environment, in a way that would be difficult in a larger team setting. We all sit in one room, working together on every problem. Everyone's voice is heard and given equal objective weight. We can quickly pivot on new ideas without hours and days of meetings. The downside, of course, is limited resources. We have to be very conscious of our direction, and make sure that we have the capability of delivering on our goals. RF: What's next after Early Access, are there any extra features you'd love to implement in Rend? JW: We come from a MMO background, where launch is just the beginning, and Rend will be no different in that regard. During Early Access, we will be adding tons of content and features, working with the community to grow the game into a full and satisfying product. When we think we have come to a point where Rend is truly a complete game experience, we will lift the Early Access tag. After that, we will take stock and see where Rend should go, whether that be new maps, new game modes, etc. RF: And finally, which aspect of Rend are you most excited for players to get to experience? JW: The Reckoning, even in its early state, has been a blast. Experiencing a true war, where all sides are present attacking and defending, really epitomizes the fantasy that draws most people to the survival genre.
  9. 2 New FKers!

    A few exciting things happened over the past few weeks that I didn’t mention before because we were getting ready for and talking about PAX. The first is that we hired two more developers at Frostkeep Studios! Don’t worry, we’ll get headshots and a new team page as soon as we get a better camera. Without further ado, here are the bios of our two new FKers! Jake Strapko Jake is known for breaking game mechanics in Rend and exploiting them to his advantage, in that order. With a lifetime of experience in competitive gaming, Jake grew up in a household where LAN parties were the norm. He competed against his brother and father in popular online games like Quake, Command: Modern Air Naval Operations and Conquer Online before eventually shifting his reserves to focus on Counter-Strike. Jake is formally trained in graphic design, product branding and apparel design, and has also ventured into competitive teams with Counter-Strike 1.5 and playing on multiple tournament teams during the Overwatch Beta where he was one of the top 500 players for Seasons 1 and 2. As one of the most active players in the Rend pre-alpha, Jake can be found streaming on Twitch and helping to build game communities. His focus at Frostkeep will be on making Rend as fair and balanced as possible. Michele Cagle Known for “making lemonade” and finding the good in everything (as Bob Ross would say, “there are no mistakes, just happy accidents”), Michele Cagle is a seasoned communications executive with nearly 20 years of gaming, corporate, entertainment and consumer products experience. Michele previously led global communications efforts at Sony Online Entertainment, Daybreak Games, THQ and Mattel, including corporate communications, brand PR, internal communications, influencer relations and events. When she’s not off saving animals or channeling her inner Bruce Lee to execute awesome campaigns, Michele can be found chasing sunsets, eating mangos, and getting salty with her family at local beaches on the mainland and in Hawaii. The next thing that happened was that we were put on Tech Raptor’s top 10 games at PAX West! This was a huge surprise and an incredible honor, especially when looking at the other games on that list (Dead Cells is sooooo good). We’re so excited to show off the game, and can’t wait to open up the pre-alpha servers again. As far as happenings around the office, I’m still plugging away at the UI rework (we’ll get another UI blog later). Tyler and Ron are working on AI and Item system design. Jake is doing some super secret work as well as focus testing and balance design. James is working on new prop items. Travis and Mat are working on making the map bigger and all the cool new biomes. David is working on some performance things regarding base building. As always we’re here answering questions from the community on Twitter, Facebook, Steam and the community Discord! Come join us! read the original article View full news
  10. 2 New FKers!

    A few exciting things happened over the past few weeks that I didn’t mention before because we were getting ready for and talking about PAX. The first is that we hired two more developers at Frostkeep Studios! Don’t worry, we’ll get headshots and a new team page as soon as we get a better camera. Without further ado, here are the bios of our two new FKers! Jake Strapko Jake is known for breaking game mechanics in Rend and exploiting them to his advantage, in that order. With a lifetime of experience in competitive gaming, Jake grew up in a household where LAN parties were the norm. He competed against his brother and father in popular online games like Quake, Command: Modern Air Naval Operations and Conquer Online before eventually shifting his reserves to focus on Counter-Strike. Jake is formally trained in graphic design, product branding and apparel design, and has also ventured into competitive teams with Counter-Strike 1.5 and playing on multiple tournament teams during the Overwatch Beta where he was one of the top 500 players for Seasons 1 and 2. As one of the most active players in the Rend pre-alpha, Jake can be found streaming on Twitch and helping to build game communities. His focus at Frostkeep will be on making Rend as fair and balanced as possible. Michele Cagle Known for “making lemonade” and finding the good in everything (as Bob Ross would say, “there are no mistakes, just happy accidents”), Michele Cagle is a seasoned communications executive with nearly 20 years of gaming, corporate, entertainment and consumer products experience. Michele previously led global communications efforts at Sony Online Entertainment, Daybreak Games, THQ and Mattel, including corporate communications, brand PR, internal communications, influencer relations and events. When she’s not off saving animals or channeling her inner Bruce Lee to execute awesome campaigns, Michele can be found chasing sunsets, eating mangos, and getting salty with her family at local beaches on the mainland and in Hawaii. The next thing that happened was that we were put on Tech Raptor’s top 10 games at PAX West! This was a huge surprise and an incredible honor, especially when looking at the other games on that list (Dead Cells is sooooo good). We’re so excited to show off the game, and can’t wait to open up the pre-alpha servers again. As far as happenings around the office, I’m still plugging away at the UI rework (we’ll get another UI blog later). Tyler and Ron are working on AI and Item system design. Jake is doing some super secret work as well as focus testing and balance design. James is working on new prop items. Travis and Mat are working on making the map bigger and all the cool new biomes. David is working on some performance things regarding base building. As always we’re here answering questions from the community on Twitter, Facebook, Steam and the community Discord! Come join us! read the original article
  11. 2 New FKers!

    A few exciting things happened over the past few weeks that I didn’t mention before because we were getting ready for and talking about PAX. The first is that we hired two more developers at Frostkeep Studios! Don’t worry, we’ll get headshots and a new team page as soon as we get a better camera. Without further ado, here are the bios of our two new FKers! Jake Strapko Jake is known for breaking game mechanics in Rend and exploiting them to his advantage, in that order. With a lifetime of experience in competitive gaming, Jake grew up in a household where LAN parties were the norm. He competed against his brother and father in popular online games like Quake, Command: Modern Air Naval Operations and Conquer Online before eventually shifting his reserves to focus on Counter-Strike. Jake is formally trained in graphic design, product branding and apparel design, and has also ventured into competitive teams with Counter-Strike 1.5 and playing on multiple tournament teams during the Overwatch Beta where he was one of the top 500 players for Seasons 1 and 2. As one of the most active players in the Rend pre-alpha, Jake can be found streaming on Twitch and helping to build game communities. His focus at Frostkeep will be on making Rend as fair and balanced as possible. Michele Cagle Known for “making lemonade” and finding the good in everything (as Bob Ross would say, “there are no mistakes, just happy accidents”), Michele Cagle is a seasoned communications executive with nearly 20 years of gaming, corporate, entertainment and consumer products experience. Michele previously led global communications efforts at Sony Online Entertainment, Daybreak Games, THQ and Mattel, including corporate communications, brand PR, internal communications, influencer relations and events. When she’s not off saving animals or channeling her inner Bruce Lee to execute awesome campaigns, Michele can be found chasing sunsets, eating mangos, and getting salty with her family at local beaches on the mainland and in Hawaii. The next thing that happened was that we were put on Tech Raptor’s top 10 games at PAX West! This was a huge surprise and an incredible honor, especially when looking at the other games on that list (Dead Cells is sooooo good). We’re so excited to show off the game, and can’t wait to open up the pre-alpha servers again. As far as happenings around the office, I’m still plugging away at the UI rework (we’ll get another UI blog later). Tyler and Ron are working on AI and Item system design. Jake is doing some super secret work as well as focus testing and balance design. James is working on new prop items. Travis and Mat are working on making the map bigger and all the cool new biomes. David is working on some performance things regarding base building. As always we’re here answering questions from the community on Twitter, Facebook, Steam and the community Discord! Come join us! read the original article
  12. Post PAX West

    Russia: https://vk.com/frostkeep?w=page-142823387_53144817
  13. Post PAX West

    So it takes a lot of work to get ready to show off your game to show off to press. We didn’t have the new map completely done so we couldn’t show that off yet, but there were a bunch of cool things that we had implemented and were really excited to show off to people. Personal base building – We got a lot of feedback from players about the lack of personal impact on the world. Yes, our faction base building worked and was fun, but only a few people per faction could be trusted with something as important as protecting everything. In addition, it took so many resources to build the base, that players never felt like they progressed in building up the base. A personal base in the valley, plus a photobomb by Mr. Elk We, also, got feedback about players not having a place to store their more valuable resources. Lastly, we found that there was a severe lack of reward for exploring in Rend. So, to combat all of those points of feedback, we are re-introducing personal base building back into Rend. Personal base building will provide more tangible and accessible base building feedback for all players. It will also allow a player to keep control of those valuable resources that are too valuable to leave in the communal chest. And now players will explore the world of Rend looking for places to build a personal base, as well as look for opponent’s personal bases. When we took personal base building out of Rend, it was a design decision based one of the major pain points in the survival genre is logging off for the night, then logging back in and your base is completely gone. You’ve lost all progression and it could take you days to get back up to speed. But, when we took personal base building out, we also lost out on the raiding mindset. No longer was their any incentive to explore the map, because you knew where everyone would be. Knowing that we wanted to add personal base building back in without adding in the pain of losing so much progress, we came up with a design that we are excited to share. It stemmed from a conversation we were having about raiding, and one of us just asked, “Does raiding have to be a zero-sum game?”. A zero-sum game is a scenario that means as many resources that the attacker takes, the defender loses. So we had to come up with some resource that the attacker would want, but wouldn’t push the defender back to the stone age. That was the concept of “research notes”, which we will get into in the next system. Personal Crafting – Previously in Rend, crafting recipes (and therefore crafting progression) was nearly entirely gated by faction technology level. This meant that as soon as your faction unlocked the tech required to make a crafting station, anyone could make that item at a crafting station. To help players specialize their role in their respective faction, we introduced crafting The control point from above. Revenant build up the base, Order now controls it. skill trees. Players will place a personal crafting station in their personal base, and then place a plug into it to provide access to different crafting skill trees. These will allow a player to make choices to specialize their specific bow and provide them the opportunity to become known as the “bow crafter” in their faction. Raiders of personal bases can come up to these personal crafting stations and steal the research notes off them (passively gained through crafting) to help them become more skilled in crafting skill trees. This research notes system, combined with the fact that items that do siege damage will require a huge amount of resources to craft, means that raiders are incentivized to keep raidees bases up and running, rather than leveling them down to the ground. Control points – To further double down on the PvP in Rend, we added control points around the map. These control points will be neutral to begin with, and once a faction claims one, the faction can build a base there. These will provide a bunch of different types of bonuses (a valuable resource node, soul collection well, etc). They are also not protected by shields like the faction base is. This means that players will be able to attack them at any time. If one faction takes a control point from another faction, they will then gain access to everything built up around that control point. Turrets that were A control point owned by Order placed by Order will now be controlled by the Conclave captors. This will encourage more strategic infiltration into the control point to capture it, instead of blowing everything to smithereens and rebuilding from scratch. My favorite part of the control points system though, is the role it plays in the Reckoning. Every Reckoning will spawn Lost Ones to attack the faction base, and every controlled control point. That means that the faction that captures all of the control points, has to defend against the lost ones at every control point. Hopefully they didn’t bite off more than they can chew. We had a wonderful time at PAX West. We spoke to some old friends and made some new ones. So far, we have had some great articles written, and I recommend you check them all out. Here are the ones that I’ve seen so far (hat tip to Zedd for the aggregation): PC Gamer Massively OP Gizorama Game Informer MMORPG.com read the original article
  14. Meet the FK'ers - Jordan Leithart

    Nice Interview
  15. Refactoring the UI: Part 1

    Translation into Russian: https://vk.com/frostkeep?w=page-142823387_53102771
  16. Refactoring the UI: Part 1

    Well now that the website is finally back in order, I feel like I can blog about Rend again. I apologize that it’s been so long since I last posted. When websites break, I get called and blogs get delayed. Today, we’re gonna take a look at what I personally have been doing. Everyone else has some amazing things to show off, but we’re saving that for a big reveal, while no one cares about the UI (*sniff*). Rend has a lot of familiar systems to survival players. These players logged into Rend for the first time and were met with a relatively familiar albeit complicated HUD. And that’s about where the similarities ended. From the get go, we had decided to design UI widgets from a more MMO standpoint. This meant to have individual windows for each widget. You would have a crafting widget, which could be opened without opening another window. Having been MMO game developers this felt natural to us, and the UI was designed and developed with that in mind. However, one of the biggest pieces of feedback that we received from players was how confusing and un-intuitive our UI was. A large part of this was the how we conveyed the information (the recipe unlocks system was a major offender of this). So Sol and I took a step back and re-evaluated the whole UI to figure out the best way to lay things out. This will be the first part of a multi-blog series about my developing the UI and our decisions on why we decided to lay things out the way they are. As always, I am available to chat with you on the community Discord, and our social medias, Facebook and Twitter . To start, we decided to change the widgets from solo windows to being in their own menu. The reason for this is two-fold. If we decide to release on a console at some point, we won’t have to change the UI around too much (though that’s a future us problem). The second and much more important reason is this: By choosing which widgets to show with which widgets, we can help the user determine what is important. With our previous UI, the amount of information that a player could have on the screen was overwhelming. By only showing widgets that interact directly with other widgets, we can simplify the UI significantly, without simplifying the systems that it is supposed to convey. We want our game to be deep and complex, not impossible to interact with due to the complexity. The first grouping that we are going to look at is the Inventory grouping. When a player accesses the inventory, there are a few things that they’re looking to do. The first is to see what’s in their inventory, so we should probably have all the inventory slots available. The second is to equip an item from the inventory. So we had to show equippable slots (both equipment slots on your character and action bar slots). Lastly, if we’re showing the equippable slots, the player needs to know what stats change when they equip the items. The end result was this mockup. As you can see the top tabs will have grouping for different UI groups, and the Inventory group is selected We have the inventory on the left, the paper doll (equipment slots/actionbar slots), and the stats on the right. Looking forward to hearing feedback on our latest iteration! read the original article
  17. Meet the FK'ers - Jordan Leithart

    Meet the FK'ers is our new short interview format to get to know the folks working at Frostkeep who are responsible for Rend. We're opening up the series with a brief chat with community superstar @FK_JarNod. RF: What's your name and what do you do at Frostkeep? JL: I'm Jordan Leithart, aka JarNod. I do anything and everything, except art... and naming things. I had my naming privileges revoked. Mostly I'm an engineer/community person. I've written almost all the UI in Rend and some of the systems. I also answer as many community questions as I can, so if you tweet at Frostkeep, I'll be the one responding. RF: Tell us a little about your backstory, where have you worked prior to joining Frostkeep, what games have you been involved in making? JL: I did all sorts of things before I got into the games industry, so I'll pass those by. I previously worked at Carbine on WildStar. I was a build engineer there. Then I moved over to AI, then I moved over to Combat/Spells for the F2P launch. RF: What game most influenced you? Was it something in your childhood or in later years? JL: Vanilla World of Warcraft had a large impact on my life, but the game that made me want to get into the games industry was actually a more recent one, Dragon Age: Origins. It was the first roleplaying game that I played through again immediately after I finished it for the first time. A year after I played that I went back to school for my Computer Science degree, and 3 years later I was working on WildStar! RF: What are you main influences in your work? Is there anything outside of the gaming world you feel has helped you become a better developer? JL: My whole life has been an influence on my work. In my opinion, games should reflect something about our world. I play lots of games, and I learn something from every single one, but outside experiences are how I became a better developer. Whether it's working at companies that weren't video game companies, to where I grew up and other hobbies I have. Everything I do helps me grow as a developer! RF: There have been a lot of Early Access Survival games released over the last few years, what do you think makes Rend stand out from the rest of them? JL: The biggest thing that separates us is our performance. We're mindful of having as performant a game as possible and that helps guide our development process. Another aspect that separates us is our focus on making a faction based survival game. We want to create a community so new players won't be lost and veterans will always have people to play with. RF: The team have been pretty fantastic at engaging with the community so far, is that something you feel is a real differentiator between Frostkeep and your competition? JL: I've seen many other studios engage with the community in a different but just as important way as Frostkeep. I've also been on the other side countless times, so it's important for me to treat the community how I wanted to be treated when I wasn't a developer. All I really know is that the Rend community has been amazing to work with so far. I don't think you can credit us at all when everyone has been wonderful. RF: Being with such a small team, what benefits do you feel you have against working in a traditional AAA studio? What do you miss from previous work? JL: Instant collaboration. If there's a problem, we can solve it quickly. Ownership of the product. We all own the entire game, not just one pie slice. Family atmosphere. We get to know each other very well. I think the biggest thing I miss from my previous work is actually the developers. I've worked with many fantastic people already in my short career and I would love to work with them again. But I know that Frostkeep is where I belong and so I don't miss much! RF: What's next after Early Access, are there any extra features you'd love to implement in Rend? JL: The most important thing after early access launch is getting the game out of early access to a full launch. Once we've accomplished that, we need to figure out if we're gonna work on an expansion or a second game. I have a few ideas. RF: And finally, which aspect of Rend are you most excited for players to get to experience? JL: With pre-alpha going dark, there are a few systems that I can't wait to talk about, but we're gonna hold off for now. Mostly, I love the faction based gameplay. I love being a part of something greater than myself. It's gonna take a lot of work for us to get it right, but it'll be worth it! Stay tuned for more interviews with the team behind Rend! View full news
  18. Meet the FK'ers - Jordan Leithart

    Meet the FK'ers is our new short interview format to get to know the folks working at Frostkeep who are responsible for Rend. We're opening up the series with a brief chat with community superstar @FK_JarNod. RF: What's your name and what do you do at Frostkeep? JL: I'm Jordan Leithart, aka JarNod. I do anything and everything, except art... and naming things. I had my naming privileges revoked. Mostly I'm an engineer/community person. I've written almost all the UI in Rend and some of the systems. I also answer as many community questions as I can, so if you tweet at Frostkeep, I'll be the one responding. RF: Tell us a little about your backstory, where have you worked prior to joining Frostkeep, what games have you been involved in making? JL: I did all sorts of things before I got into the games industry, so I'll pass those by. I previously worked at Carbine on WildStar. I was a build engineer there. Then I moved over to AI, then I moved over to Combat/Spells for the F2P launch. RF: What game most influenced you? Was it something in your childhood or in later years? JL: Vanilla World of Warcraft had a large impact on my life, but the game that made me want to get into the games industry was actually a more recent one, Dragon Age: Origins. It was the first roleplaying game that I played through again immediately after I finished it for the first time. A year after I played that I went back to school for my Computer Science degree, and 3 years later I was working on WildStar! RF: What are you main influences in your work? Is there anything outside of the gaming world you feel has helped you become a better developer? JL: My whole life has been an influence on my work. In my opinion, games should reflect something about our world. I play lots of games, and I learn something from every single one, but outside experiences are how I became a better developer. Whether it's working at companies that weren't video game companies, to where I grew up and other hobbies I have. Everything I do helps me grow as a developer! RF: There have been a lot of Early Access Survival games released over the last few years, what do you think makes Rend stand out from the rest of them? JL: The biggest thing that separates us is our performance. We're mindful of having as performant a game as possible and that helps guide our development process. Another aspect that separates us is our focus on making a faction based survival game. We want to create a community so new players won't be lost and veterans will always have people to play with. RF: The team have been pretty fantastic at engaging with the community so far, is that something you feel is a real differentiator between Frostkeep and your competition? JL: I've seen many other studios engage with the community in a different but just as important way as Frostkeep. I've also been on the other side countless times, so it's important for me to treat the community how I wanted to be treated when I wasn't a developer. All I really know is that the Rend community has been amazing to work with so far. I don't think you can credit us at all when everyone has been wonderful. RF: Being with such a small team, what benefits do you feel you have against working in a traditional AAA studio? What do you miss from previous work? JL: Instant collaboration. If there's a problem, we can solve it quickly. Ownership of the product. We all own the entire game, not just one pie slice. Family atmosphere. We get to know each other very well. I think the biggest thing I miss from my previous work is actually the developers. I've worked with many fantastic people already in my short career and I would love to work with them again. But I know that Frostkeep is where I belong and so I don't miss much! RF: What's next after Early Access, are there any extra features you'd love to implement in Rend? JL: The most important thing after early access launch is getting the game out of early access to a full launch. Once we've accomplished that, we need to figure out if we're gonna work on an expansion or a second game. I have a few ideas. RF: And finally, which aspect of Rend are you most excited for players to get to experience? JL: With pre-alpha going dark, there are a few systems that I can't wait to talk about, but we're gonna hold off for now. Mostly, I love the faction based gameplay. I love being a part of something greater than myself. It's gonna take a lot of work for us to get it right, but it'll be worth it! Stay tuned for more interviews with the team behind Rend!
  19. Our last month

    Well well well. I figured now was as good as any to give you a look into the happenings at Frostkeep over the last month. Unfortunately, I’m not going to go into details on what exactly we’re doing (Need to save those for later blog posts when we have the designs/implementation more finalized), but I will provide some hints. One thing I want to do is introduce all of the new FKers that joined since the last blog post. In order of hiring: Travis Inman: Some of you may know him as FK_EvilRadish in the discord. Travis has been a contract artist working with us for the past 9 months. He played the most during our pre-alpha and was invaluable in fixing art bugs and interacting with our players. We’re very excited to have him here. I can’t wait to get our current players into the game (and new players) because they’re gonna be blown away. You can read Travis’ bio over on the team page! Nick De Spain: For the last 12+ months, our artists have operated without a concept artist. That needed to change, so we went out and found the best one! Even better than being a concept artist, Nick has experience with outsourcing and is highly interested in UX design and art. We’re very lucky to have him. I can’t wait to show some of the concept art that he’s already come up with. Needless to say, Rend will be teeming with a higher variety of fauna when we open up the servers again. Nick’s bio is over on the team page! Ron Roy: Whenever someone who has worked with or works with Ron is asked about him, they always talk about the same thing. His foot pedal. You see, the left shift key on a keyboard puts a decent amount of strain on the wrist, and programmers use shift a LOT. So Ron bought a foot pedal, and uses it as his shift key. The best way to describe Ron is that he thinks in multi-core processors, while the rest of us think in single core processors. His ability to multi-task and fix bugs is astounding. Ron will absolutely make Rend a better game with his engineering ability, and his game design sense. You can read more about Ron on the team page. Tyler Fuchs: There are a handful of people in the world who I would play the game they created without question. Tyler is one of those. His ability to wrap his mind around games is astounding and whenever he says that a game should be played, I know I need to go play that game right now. The most recent example was a game called Dead Cells (highly recommended btw). Tyler brings some much needed player psychology analysis and systems design to Rend. We’re looking forward to seeing the systems that he designs and builds. Tyler’s bio is over on the team page. As for what is being worked on in the game. There’s no problem with my talking about what I’m doing right now, because it’s not very exciting. I’ve been reworking the UI menus in Rend with the purpose of simplifying the experience of a new player without hiding too much information from the veteran player. I’ll happily go into more detail in a later blogpost if there’s interest. read the original article
  20. What time is it? Key giveaway time!

    YEAH IT`S MINE
  21. Announcement regarding launch date

    It's a pity :( Translated into Russian: https://vk.com/page-142823387_53024785
  22. Announcement regarding launch date

    I guess that means a pre-alpha key for everyone still not in to compensate us for the delay. The obvious being said, that is nice news you manage to get that opportunity (cash entry I suppose). Against games like Fortnite coming out too, you will need all the bullets you can get.
  23. Are We gonna have Maps in the Game?

    I really want a Minimap
  24. Announcement regarding launch date

    Good news that devs are taking time to fix the bugs and game but do not like the delay news.
  25. Announcement regarding launch date

    Hello everyone, We have some exciting news and game updates to share with you today. First, thank you to everyone who is participating in our pre-alpha. Your feedback is valuable and helps us to improve the overall game experience in Rend. As mentioned before, we created Frostkeep Studios with the hope and vision of evolving the industry forward, specifically with the survival genre. Our goal with Rend is to present a fresh approach to gameplay and exceed players’ traditional expectations. The excitement around the game has brought our studio an amazing opportunity to take Rend to the next level. With this new support, we are re-evaluating current development plans and exploring ways in which we can deliver an even more robust in-game experience at launch. Our team is incredibly grateful for this new opportunity to make Rend an even better game than we originally envisioned. Given these significant updates, we have shifted the early access launch date on Steam to later this year to factor in time for adding in these new features and mechanics. In the upcoming weeks, please expect ongoing updates to the game. This may include dark periods where the game is not accessible. We will be in touch soon to share more of these updates as they are available. Thank you again for your support – see you in game. The Frostkeep Team read the original article
  26. Are We gonna have Maps in the Game?

    no map, no minimap and no compass. To see where you are you have to look at the world tree. Its an unwritten rule the the world tree is allways north and the home base is allways in the oposite direction of the tree. There is a rain catcher but it doesnt work as there is no rain so yet. For seasons thats not the case but there are different bioms on the map. The Area around each faction is grass / hill land. Center is a bit mir dry and there is also the Frozen wasteland , the Larva spider cave and hopefully more.
  27. Are We gonna have Maps in the Game?

    What about the following: - different weathers / seasons for the map? - other maps altogether after release?
  28. Are We gonna have Maps in the Game?

    Haven't seen anything like that yet. One of the nice things about the map being fixed (and duplicated for all factions) is that people should start learning the way it's laid out, which will give them an advantage.
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