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iamacyborg

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  1. Introduce Yourselves

    Welcome @Rikudou!
  2. Meet the FK'ers - Jeremy Wood

    Continuing from the last Meet the FK'ers with Jordan Leithart, we've got a brief chat with Frostkeep co-founder Jeremy Wood. Check it out below. RF: What's your name and what do you do at Frostkeep? JW: Jeremy Wood, Co-Founder RF: Tell us a little about your backstory, where have you worked prior to joining Frostkeep, what games have you been involved in making? JW: I got my start as an engineer on the original World of Warcraft team back in 2001. After seven years and two expansions, I moved onto Titan, which eventually became Overwatch. In 2012, I joined Carbine to work on WildStar, until forming Frostkeep in 2016. RF: What game most influenced you? Was it something in your childhood or in later years? JW: I play a wide variety of games, PC and console, as many as I can get my hands on. I feel that there is something to learn from every single game, and the more I play, the better I am able to contribute to the games I work on. World of Warcraft is probably my single biggest influence, and probably the game I've sunk the most time into over the years. RF: What are you main influences in your work? Is there anything outside of the gaming world you feel has helped you become a better developer? Being a successful game developer is mostly about effective two-way communication. I am always looking to better myself from that standpoint, and I've been incredibly fortunate to learn from many amazing people, both professionally and personally. Understanding human psychology provides great tools for communication, as well as for game design in general. Game developers tend to focus so much on "fun", which is ultimately impossible to quantify. Really boiling down the psychological impact of content and systems is a more objective way of measuring the success of your designs. RF: There have been a lot of Early Access Survival games released over the last few years, what do you think makes Rend stand out from the rest of them? JW: The biggest things we've tried to do with Rend is provide social structure for those who come in alone or in small groups, and to really give strong competitive goals to all players. Most survival games rely entirely on their sandbox elements, which is obviously enough for a large section of players. Our aim is to bring some structure to the genre and attract a wider swath of players to this rich and interesting survival community. RF: The team have been pretty fantastic at engaging with the community so far, is that something you feel is a real differentiator between Frostkeep and your competition? JW: One of our goals as a company has always been to be "real", cliched as that may be. We are gamers just like everyone else in our community, and we engage with them as gamers first, not as developers. We are all creating Rend together, even if Frostkeep is ultimately making the decisions and building the game. We want to be human beings, rather than faceless PR bots, and that means sharing in our failures and our successes, and ultimately being honest with the community about the realities of game development. RF: Being with such a small team, what benefits do you feel you have against working in a traditional AAA studio? What do you miss from previous work? JW: Our size allows us to have a highly collaborative work environment, in a way that would be difficult in a larger team setting. We all sit in one room, working together on every problem. Everyone's voice is heard and given equal objective weight. We can quickly pivot on new ideas without hours and days of meetings. The downside, of course, is limited resources. We have to be very conscious of our direction, and make sure that we have the capability of delivering on our goals. RF: What's next after Early Access, are there any extra features you'd love to implement in Rend? JW: We come from a MMO background, where launch is just the beginning, and Rend will be no different in that regard. During Early Access, we will be adding tons of content and features, working with the community to grow the game into a full and satisfying product. When we think we have come to a point where Rend is truly a complete game experience, we will lift the Early Access tag. After that, we will take stock and see where Rend should go, whether that be new maps, new game modes, etc. RF: And finally, which aspect of Rend are you most excited for players to get to experience? JW: The Reckoning, even in its early state, has been a blast. Experiencing a true war, where all sides are present attacking and defending, really epitomizes the fantasy that draws most people to the survival genre. View full news
  3. Meet the FK'ers - Jeremy Wood

    Continuing from the last Meet the FK'ers with Jordan Leithart, we've got a brief chat with Frostkeep co-founder Jeremy Wood. Check it out below. RF: What's your name and what do you do at Frostkeep? JW: Jeremy Wood, Co-Founder RF: Tell us a little about your backstory, where have you worked prior to joining Frostkeep, what games have you been involved in making? JW: I got my start as an engineer on the original World of Warcraft team back in 2001. After seven years and two expansions, I moved onto Titan, which eventually became Overwatch. In 2012, I joined Carbine to work on WildStar, until forming Frostkeep in 2016. RF: What game most influenced you? Was it something in your childhood or in later years? JW: I play a wide variety of games, PC and console, as many as I can get my hands on. I feel that there is something to learn from every single game, and the more I play, the better I am able to contribute to the games I work on. World of Warcraft is probably my single biggest influence, and probably the game I've sunk the most time into over the years. RF: What are you main influences in your work? Is there anything outside of the gaming world you feel has helped you become a better developer? Being a successful game developer is mostly about effective two-way communication. I am always looking to better myself from that standpoint, and I've been incredibly fortunate to learn from many amazing people, both professionally and personally. Understanding human psychology provides great tools for communication, as well as for game design in general. Game developers tend to focus so much on "fun", which is ultimately impossible to quantify. Really boiling down the psychological impact of content and systems is a more objective way of measuring the success of your designs. RF: There have been a lot of Early Access Survival games released over the last few years, what do you think makes Rend stand out from the rest of them? JW: The biggest things we've tried to do with Rend is provide social structure for those who come in alone or in small groups, and to really give strong competitive goals to all players. Most survival games rely entirely on their sandbox elements, which is obviously enough for a large section of players. Our aim is to bring some structure to the genre and attract a wider swath of players to this rich and interesting survival community. RF: The team have been pretty fantastic at engaging with the community so far, is that something you feel is a real differentiator between Frostkeep and your competition? JW: One of our goals as a company has always been to be "real", cliched as that may be. We are gamers just like everyone else in our community, and we engage with them as gamers first, not as developers. We are all creating Rend together, even if Frostkeep is ultimately making the decisions and building the game. We want to be human beings, rather than faceless PR bots, and that means sharing in our failures and our successes, and ultimately being honest with the community about the realities of game development. RF: Being with such a small team, what benefits do you feel you have against working in a traditional AAA studio? What do you miss from previous work? JW: Our size allows us to have a highly collaborative work environment, in a way that would be difficult in a larger team setting. We all sit in one room, working together on every problem. Everyone's voice is heard and given equal objective weight. We can quickly pivot on new ideas without hours and days of meetings. The downside, of course, is limited resources. We have to be very conscious of our direction, and make sure that we have the capability of delivering on our goals. RF: What's next after Early Access, are there any extra features you'd love to implement in Rend? JW: We come from a MMO background, where launch is just the beginning, and Rend will be no different in that regard. During Early Access, we will be adding tons of content and features, working with the community to grow the game into a full and satisfying product. When we think we have come to a point where Rend is truly a complete game experience, we will lift the Early Access tag. After that, we will take stock and see where Rend should go, whether that be new maps, new game modes, etc. RF: And finally, which aspect of Rend are you most excited for players to get to experience? JW: The Reckoning, even in its early state, has been a blast. Experiencing a true war, where all sides are present attacking and defending, really epitomizes the fantasy that draws most people to the survival genre.
  4. Meet the FK'ers - Jordan Leithart

    Meet the FK'ers is our new short interview format to get to know the folks working at Frostkeep who are responsible for Rend. We're opening up the series with a brief chat with community superstar @FK_JarNod. RF: What's your name and what do you do at Frostkeep? JL: I'm Jordan Leithart, aka JarNod. I do anything and everything, except art... and naming things. I had my naming privileges revoked. Mostly I'm an engineer/community person. I've written almost all the UI in Rend and some of the systems. I also answer as many community questions as I can, so if you tweet at Frostkeep, I'll be the one responding. RF: Tell us a little about your backstory, where have you worked prior to joining Frostkeep, what games have you been involved in making? JL: I did all sorts of things before I got into the games industry, so I'll pass those by. I previously worked at Carbine on WildStar. I was a build engineer there. Then I moved over to AI, then I moved over to Combat/Spells for the F2P launch. RF: What game most influenced you? Was it something in your childhood or in later years? JL: Vanilla World of Warcraft had a large impact on my life, but the game that made me want to get into the games industry was actually a more recent one, Dragon Age: Origins. It was the first roleplaying game that I played through again immediately after I finished it for the first time. A year after I played that I went back to school for my Computer Science degree, and 3 years later I was working on WildStar! RF: What are you main influences in your work? Is there anything outside of the gaming world you feel has helped you become a better developer? JL: My whole life has been an influence on my work. In my opinion, games should reflect something about our world. I play lots of games, and I learn something from every single one, but outside experiences are how I became a better developer. Whether it's working at companies that weren't video game companies, to where I grew up and other hobbies I have. Everything I do helps me grow as a developer! RF: There have been a lot of Early Access Survival games released over the last few years, what do you think makes Rend stand out from the rest of them? JL: The biggest thing that separates us is our performance. We're mindful of having as performant a game as possible and that helps guide our development process. Another aspect that separates us is our focus on making a faction based survival game. We want to create a community so new players won't be lost and veterans will always have people to play with. RF: The team have been pretty fantastic at engaging with the community so far, is that something you feel is a real differentiator between Frostkeep and your competition? JL: I've seen many other studios engage with the community in a different but just as important way as Frostkeep. I've also been on the other side countless times, so it's important for me to treat the community how I wanted to be treated when I wasn't a developer. All I really know is that the Rend community has been amazing to work with so far. I don't think you can credit us at all when everyone has been wonderful. RF: Being with such a small team, what benefits do you feel you have against working in a traditional AAA studio? What do you miss from previous work? JL: Instant collaboration. If there's a problem, we can solve it quickly. Ownership of the product. We all own the entire game, not just one pie slice. Family atmosphere. We get to know each other very well. I think the biggest thing I miss from my previous work is actually the developers. I've worked with many fantastic people already in my short career and I would love to work with them again. But I know that Frostkeep is where I belong and so I don't miss much! RF: What's next after Early Access, are there any extra features you'd love to implement in Rend? JL: The most important thing after early access launch is getting the game out of early access to a full launch. Once we've accomplished that, we need to figure out if we're gonna work on an expansion or a second game. I have a few ideas. RF: And finally, which aspect of Rend are you most excited for players to get to experience? JL: With pre-alpha going dark, there are a few systems that I can't wait to talk about, but we're gonna hold off for now. Mostly, I love the faction based gameplay. I love being a part of something greater than myself. It's gonna take a lot of work for us to get it right, but it'll be worth it! Stay tuned for more interviews with the team behind Rend! View full news
  5. Meet the FK'ers - Jordan Leithart

    Meet the FK'ers is our new short interview format to get to know the folks working at Frostkeep who are responsible for Rend. We're opening up the series with a brief chat with community superstar @FK_JarNod. RF: What's your name and what do you do at Frostkeep? JL: I'm Jordan Leithart, aka JarNod. I do anything and everything, except art... and naming things. I had my naming privileges revoked. Mostly I'm an engineer/community person. I've written almost all the UI in Rend and some of the systems. I also answer as many community questions as I can, so if you tweet at Frostkeep, I'll be the one responding. RF: Tell us a little about your backstory, where have you worked prior to joining Frostkeep, what games have you been involved in making? JL: I did all sorts of things before I got into the games industry, so I'll pass those by. I previously worked at Carbine on WildStar. I was a build engineer there. Then I moved over to AI, then I moved over to Combat/Spells for the F2P launch. RF: What game most influenced you? Was it something in your childhood or in later years? JL: Vanilla World of Warcraft had a large impact on my life, but the game that made me want to get into the games industry was actually a more recent one, Dragon Age: Origins. It was the first roleplaying game that I played through again immediately after I finished it for the first time. A year after I played that I went back to school for my Computer Science degree, and 3 years later I was working on WildStar! RF: What are you main influences in your work? Is there anything outside of the gaming world you feel has helped you become a better developer? JL: My whole life has been an influence on my work. In my opinion, games should reflect something about our world. I play lots of games, and I learn something from every single one, but outside experiences are how I became a better developer. Whether it's working at companies that weren't video game companies, to where I grew up and other hobbies I have. Everything I do helps me grow as a developer! RF: There have been a lot of Early Access Survival games released over the last few years, what do you think makes Rend stand out from the rest of them? JL: The biggest thing that separates us is our performance. We're mindful of having as performant a game as possible and that helps guide our development process. Another aspect that separates us is our focus on making a faction based survival game. We want to create a community so new players won't be lost and veterans will always have people to play with. RF: The team have been pretty fantastic at engaging with the community so far, is that something you feel is a real differentiator between Frostkeep and your competition? JL: I've seen many other studios engage with the community in a different but just as important way as Frostkeep. I've also been on the other side countless times, so it's important for me to treat the community how I wanted to be treated when I wasn't a developer. All I really know is that the Rend community has been amazing to work with so far. I don't think you can credit us at all when everyone has been wonderful. RF: Being with such a small team, what benefits do you feel you have against working in a traditional AAA studio? What do you miss from previous work? JL: Instant collaboration. If there's a problem, we can solve it quickly. Ownership of the product. We all own the entire game, not just one pie slice. Family atmosphere. We get to know each other very well. I think the biggest thing I miss from my previous work is actually the developers. I've worked with many fantastic people already in my short career and I would love to work with them again. But I know that Frostkeep is where I belong and so I don't miss much! RF: What's next after Early Access, are there any extra features you'd love to implement in Rend? JL: The most important thing after early access launch is getting the game out of early access to a full launch. Once we've accomplished that, we need to figure out if we're gonna work on an expansion or a second game. I have a few ideas. RF: And finally, which aspect of Rend are you most excited for players to get to experience? JL: With pre-alpha going dark, there are a few systems that I can't wait to talk about, but we're gonna hold off for now. Mostly, I love the faction based gameplay. I love being a part of something greater than myself. It's gonna take a lot of work for us to get it right, but it'll be worth it! Stay tuned for more interviews with the team behind Rend!
  6. Are We gonna have Maps in the Game?

    Haven't seen anything like that yet. One of the nice things about the map being fixed (and duplicated for all factions) is that people should start learning the way it's laid out, which will give them an advantage.
  7. When the Game is coming Out?Its already Spring

    It'll be Spring right up until it's no longer Spring, which in the Northern Hemisphere is the 21st June.
  8. Cant see anything

    No, players just need to be prepared and bring light sources
  9. Introduce Yourselves

    Hey, could we not talk about buying keys please. It is really not in the spirit of the pre-alpha, and I suspect the folks at FK will be cracking down on people who sell or purchase these.
  10. What time is it? Key giveaway time!

    The contest ended last week
  11. What time is it? Key giveaway time!

    Hi, keys have gone out via PM to the 10 lucky winners. Sorry to those of you who didn't get one this time, hopefully we can do another giveaway soon
  12. Order - Guild recruiting topic

    @Eaden feel free to also create a new Club for your Guild
  13. What TV Series are U Watching?

    I remember ordering ADWD in '06 and the Amazon confirmation email telling me it'd be delivered in '07
  14. Forum Improvements

    @Eaden this forum is community run, it's not operated by Frostkeep. Adding groups with tags for the 3 factions is definitely planned, I'll try get something for that soon
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